Great Debut for Character from Rhyme Books

The Sleeping Doll (Kathryn Dance #1) - Jeffery Deaver

I was really intrigued by the character of Kathryn Dance in "Cold Moon." Having a character that uses kinesics in order to get witnesses and suspects to open up and or confess.

 

In "The Sleeping Doll" we get more information on the character of Kathryn Dance. She works at the California Bureau of Investigation (think of a state office set up like the FBI) and is about to interrogate a man who murdered a family decades earlier (Daniel Pell). Pell is seen as similar to Charles Manson due to having his own family (teenage girls) who he commanded to steal from stores and homes in order to support the family. When new information comes up linking Pell to a murder Dance is set in to break him and get him to confess. Too late Dance realizes that Pell is up to something and then he escapes. This books follows Dance's efforts to track down and stop Pell as well as following Pell as he continues to wreck havoc.

 

There are multiple POVs in this book per usual for a Deaver book. We get Dance, Pell, and some of the teens (now older women) who came under Pell's spell decades earlier. We also get a POV from a writer who is going to write about the family that was murdered and the lone survivor of that murder (the so called Sleeping Doll). Deaver manages to do a good job shifting from each POV. I was honestly surprised since I thought it be too much.

 

I can say I wanted more of Dance though. Deaver was slow to reveal details about Dance, but at least I had questions answered about her from "Cold Moon." Due to Dance being a widow she has a lot of trouble trying to establish a new relationship without dealing with her kids disapproval. And because of Dance's special abilities she does a lot of analysis of her friends and family. It's kind of like being around a human version of a Vulcan.

 

Deaver gets a bit too in depth at times when explaining Dance's methods when interrogating cooperative and uncooperative witnesses. We also get to see how Pell manipulates people around him. And we definitely focus more on people's motivations, thought processes, and even body movements. I found this whole thing pretty fascinating.

 

The flow worked nicely in this one and of course we get typical Deaver twists, though they work in this one. Unlike with the Rhyme books I didn't feel like these were meant to shock. If you're paying attention you realize that Deaver was giving clues all along the way.

 

The setting of this one takes place in California. What I wish we had gotten more details about is the areas near Dance. Deaver provides details on Dance's home and her deck (which features prominently in this book) but I would have liked the same attention of detail regarding the history of the state and town they are in like he does in the Rhyme books.

 

The ending left me with some questions regarding Dance, her romantic relationships, and her family. I can't wait for the next one.