Great Debut, But Development Was Off in Places And Ending Didn't Stick the Landing

More Happy Than Not - Adam Silvera

This was recommended to me since I loved "Everyone We've Been." This book has a similar setup teen gets to a tough moment in life and wants to go an institute and get his memoires suppressed. However, there's a twist and then even more after that. I felt for the character of Aaron Soto. However, I found the teen to at times be selfish when the truth comes out and he demands that other people who are not ready are weaker than him which made me uncomfortable. Some of the other characters motivations in this book felt off to me and the ending didn't work.

 

Aaron Soto is a typical teenager who is in love with his girlfriend. He is nervous about losing his virginity to her and that he will be terrible. He is also still recovering from the fact that his father committed suicide. We don't get a lot of details until the middle of the book to find out what caused Aaron's father to commit suicide. Aaron's mother and brother are distant from him and he only feels connected to his neighborhood friends. When Aaron meets newcomer Thomas, all of a sudden Aaron starts to feel different and finds himself leaning on Thomas when his girlfriend goes away to art camp. When Aaron comes to a realization that he is gay and in love with Thomas he seeks out the Leteo Institute in order to have his memory of bring gay removed. 

 

I give insta-love crap no matter the setup, and the insta-love in this book between Thomas and Aaron didn't work. I think they hung out for two weeks or so and it seems weird to me that Aaron would all of a sudden go from I am in love with this boy I just met. Speaking of Thomas, he felt like a blank slate. I didn't get his character period. Aaron constantly asserts that Thomas had to be scared of coming out and implies that Thomas is in love with him. Everytime we "see" Thomas he looks bad and like he's slowly being drained of life. Due to an attack that happens to Aaron, I got the worry, but everything after that felt like an over reaction. Maybe Silvia was just showing us that Aaron's perspective was skewed, when it came to Thomas, I don't know. 

 

I really can't say much about anyone else in this book without spoilers, so I'll skip over them. I will say that Aaron's father's suicide doesn't make sense to me when we find out why he did it. I guess I just don't see it as something believable. I don't know. Also there were so many vague details concerning Aaron's father I was once again wondering what was going on until pretty much the end.

 

The writing was okay and I think since I read "Everyone We've Been" the twist was expected. Everything after the twists though felt rushed. The flow was up and down and too and I still scratched my head a bit about some of the narrative choices Silvia takes.

 

The setting of the Bronx in this type of futuristic setting seems poorer and more brutal than what I think it is like in real life. What I thought was odd was this world feels pretty mundane even with the idea of the institute. 

 

The ending was sad and I think a bit of a cheat.