Just Okay Read From Beginning to End

Fatal Friends, Deadly Neighbors: Ann Rule's Crime Files Volume 16 - Ann Rule

This was just an okay read from beginning to end.

I think the issue is that the first two cases were pretty much unsolved mysteries. So you can guess at what happened, but you don't really know. After that, I didn't get the reason why some of these cases were included in this volume. The last two were just sad and by the end of the book I ended up feeling worse when you read about how little time some of the guilty actually do get.

I think the main problem is that after a while Rule writes in such a predictable way that I don't feel surprised. But I will say that the first case had so much similar language to how she starts off some of her volumes or other stand alone books that I got confused for a while wondering if I had bought this book before. I had to go back to my Kindle account to make sure.

Rule includes some pictures of some of the victims and murderers and police involved in this volume and honestly besides the pictures of the victims and accused, I never get why she always involves the police officers in the book so much. At least she skipped over their backgrounds for this, and I think she had to cause of the length of the volume.

The first case deals with the Susan Powell case that I think many readers may know about. That ended up being in the media for a while due to the missing woman and what happened afterwards. I won't spoil for those who don't know. But the fact that there is still a question of what happened to Powell and you find out how limited justice is with regards to one of the men involved in her case, it just makes you a bit frustrated.

The second case deals with a man who deals with two quick tragedies. One involving his young son and his girlfriend. This case left way too many questions than answers. I am still confused about what went on and why the police ignored some leads. There seemed to be something else going on there. But once again, you don't get a happy resolution to this case.

The third case was a quickie. We quickly find out the who and why behind the murder of an elderly couple who were good philanthropists.

The fourth case was a head scratcher. I felt like Rule was just dragging this out. You find out that someone is setting fires and the same person is always on the scene. She made it seem like the police did this tireless work, but honestly it seemed like the guy finally got caught after the fourth fire he set. She includes pictures of the police involved and I maybe went who cares at that point.

The fifth case was disturbing. I tell myself that something like that can't happen again, but you never know in this world. A serial rapist is involved.

The sixth case I honestly don't know what to make of it. Once again just like cases one and two there seemed to not be a definitive answer about the person's guilt. And I didn't feel swayed by Rule's arguments.

The seventh case was open and shut due to all of the links to the person who did it. And then they confessed. I felt unsettled though since this and many of the cases highlighted in the 70s show that most of these people seemed to get out within 10 years or so and are out among us now. Rule doesn't say if the person who was the murderer in this one is out, but it's heavily implied due to his sentence and when he was convicted.

The eighth case was definitely one where everyone was covering for the guilty party and then you can see what additional mistakes are made when the guy gets out of prison eventually. I didn't even know what to say about this one.

The ninth case was devastating. This one was truly a case of a deadly neighbor and all I could think about was the poor family.