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Obsidian Blue

Government drone by day and book lover and geek girl by night!

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Death on the Edge
Sara Paretsky
Shell Game (V.I. Warshawski #19)
Sara Paretsky
A Question of Holmes
Brittany Cavallaro
Death and Other Happy Endings
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Meet Me at the Cupcake Cafe: A Novel with Recipes
Jenny Colgan
Fingersmith
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Thursday Library Reads: April 18, 2019

Yeah no movement. And I need to pick up a library book before the librarians kicks my ass.

 

-Blue

 

Borrowed: (2)

Cover image for A Question of HolmesFingersmith - ebook

 

Hold: (14)

 

Physical Copies: (4)

[More detail about this title is available][More detail about this title is available]The Night Tiger - ebook[More detail about this title is available]

 

Electronic Copies: (10)

Cover image for An Anonymous Girl[More detail about this title is available]Cover image for Bring Me BackCover image for Lisey's StoryCover image for Where the Crawdads SingCover image for Dark of the MoonCover image for The Book of Lost ThingsCover image for The Lost ManCover image for The BreakdownMaid - ebook

 

Super Hold (3):

 

Cover image for The Waste LandsCover image for CIRCECover image for I'm Thinking of Ending Things

 

Read (0):

 

 

 
 

Just Keep Swimming...

Swimming for Sunlight - Allie Larkin

Please note that I received this via NetGalley. This did not affect my rating or review.

 

So "Swimming for Sunlight." I went back and forth on this one. The main character is Katie Ellis who divorces her husband and takes her rescue dog Bark back to Florida to stay with her maternal grandmother, Nan. Katie gives up everything that she is entitled to so her husband doesn't get joint custody of the dog. So she arrives with paper bags filled with clothes and I kid you not when your grandmother quizzes her about not getting cardboard boxes she explains her dog, Bark, doesn't like them. I should have known what I was getting into from that point. 

 

Katie was a freaking martyr and didn't even see it. She was also causing her dog severe anxiety due to her actions. I did feel sorry for her. She was there when her father died and she pulled him from the lake they were swimming at. Cue her mother dumping her to live with her grandmother while she followed men all over the world and stopped communicating with her. So there is sympathy for Katie, but I got annoyed at how she dealt with everything. She tells her grandmother Nan that Bark can't be walked since he is so scared so they dance around the living room for exercise. Yeah my face is your face right now. Katie also can't handle going to funerals since it reminds her of her father so she's been largely absent with her childhood best friend who lost two grandparents and her grandmother's best friend who also lost a spouse. Everyone just excuses it and it drives me up the wall. And then we finally get into the one who got away and once again it was 100 percent her fault and I just hard sighed when we finally read about what tore them apart.

 

That said, Katie didn't deserve the break up of her marriage due to her husband's cheating and though she seems to have found a sense of closure in the end I just rolled my eyes.


Larkin doesn't spend much time developing secondary characters past a few people such as Nan, Bunny, Mo, Mr. Issac and Luca. Other characters drop in and drop out with Katie getting "insight" into them. Not enough to stop being a drama queen though. I get she has abandonment issues but good grief. Luca was the most patient person in the world. I really wish there had been more discussion between them when it finally comes out what caused them to end back in college. It felt like such a flimsy BS excuse that if I were Luca I would have been done at that moment. For me, how can you trust that you won't do something else the person won't like and they won't push you away for years. 


That said though I couldn't put this book down. I loved reading about how Katie came to love sewing and show she got into costume work. Her working at Mr. Issac's shop was highlight and her doing research on how to create her grandmother and the other "mermaids" outfits was interesting. I got so curious about underwater costume work and makeup after reading this book. 

 

The writing starts off slow at first and the flow was a bit off at the beginning. I think that's because as readers we are reading Katie tell her story in her own way and for the most part she is trying to hide things from herself and has to lie to herself that her dog is fully dependent on her so she has reasons to say no to doing anything.

The setting of Florida didn't feel like a proper setting though. I think because most of the book takes place at Katie's grandmother's home, Mo's house and Mr. Issac's shop. We read about it, but I can't recall if Larkin described the smell of the ocean being nearby, the humidity, etc. This could have taken place anywhere. 


The ending ends on a hopeful note and you do root for Katie in the end. Being held hostage to all of the bad things that can happen all the time sounds exhausting.

Reading progress update: I've read 100%.

Swimming for Sunlight - Allie Larkin

So this may end up being my review for this book. I don't know yet. I do know that I have some weird viral thing that has resulted in me coughing since Thursday and led to me not being able to sleep since then too since anytime I tried to lay down I coughed.

 

So "Swimming for Sunlight." I went back and forth on this one. The main character is Katie Ellis who divorces her husband and takes her rescue dog Bark back to Florida to stay with her maternal grandmother, Nan. Katie gives up everything that she is entitled to so her husband doesn't get joint custody of the dog. So she arrives with paper bags filled with clothes and I kid you not when your grandmother quizzes her about not getting cardboard boxes she explains her dog, Bark, doesn't like them. I should have known what I was getting into from that point. 

 

Katie was a freaking martyr and didn't even see it. She was also causing her dog severe anxiety due to her actions. I did feel sorry for her. She was there when her father died and she pulled him from the lake they were swimming at. Cue her mother dumping her to live with her grandmother while she followed men all over the world and stopped communicating with her. So there is sympathy for Katie, but I got annoyed at how she dealt with everything. She tells her grandmother Nan that Bark can't be walked since he is so scared so they dance around the living room for exercise. Yeah my face is your face right now. Katie also can't handle going to funerals since it reminds her of her father so she's been largely absent with her childhood best friend who lost two grandparents and her grandmother's best friend who also lost a spouse. Everyone just excuses it and it drives me up the wall. And then we finally get into the one who got away and once again it was 100 percent her fault and I just hard sighed when we finally read about what tore them apart.

 

That said, Katie didn't deserve the break up of her marriage due to her husband's cheating and though she seems to have found a sense of closure in the end I just rolled my eyes.


Larkin doesn't spend much time developing secondary characters past a few people such as Nan, Bunny, Mo, Mr. Issac and Luca. Other characters drop in and drop out with Katie getting "insight" into them. Not enough to stop being a drama queen though. I get she has abandonment issues but good grief. Luca was the most patient person in the world. I really wish there had been more discussion between them when it finally comes out what caused them to end back in college. It felt like such a flimsy BS excuse that if I were Luca I would have been done at that moment. For me, how can you trust that you won't do something else the person won't like and they won't push you away for years. 


That said though I couldn't put this book down. I loved reading about how Katie came to love sewing and show she got into costume work. Her working at Mr. Issac's shop was highlight and her doing research on how to create her grandmother and the other "mermaids" outfits was interesting. I got so curious about underwater costume work and makeup after reading this book. 

 

The writing starts off slow at first and the flow was a bit off at the beginning. I think that's because as readers we are reading Katie tell her story in her own way and for the most part she is trying to hide things from herself and has to lie to herself that her dog is fully dependent on her so she has reasons to say no to doing anything.

The setting of Florida didn't feel like a proper setting though. I think because most of the book takes place at Katie's grandmother's home, Mo's house and Mr. Issac's shop. We read about it, but I can't recall if Larkin described the smell of the ocean being nearby, the humidity, etc. This could have taken place anywhere. 


The ending ends on a hopeful note and you do root for Katie in the end. Being held hostage to all of the bad things that can happen all the time sounds exhausting. 

April 11, 2019: Thursday Library Reads

It's been a while. Due to work travel I ended up not being able to finish everything I wanted and some of the books are now just in what I call a super hold (I can't hold them since I already have 10 books on hold). I don't want to forget that I want to read them so I am going to continue to track them.


What library reads are you all enjoying? 

 

-Blue

 

Borrowed: (2)

Cover image for A Question of HolmesFingersmith - ebook

 

Hold: (14)

 

Physical Copies: (4)

[More detail about this title is available][More detail about this title is available]The Night Tiger - ebook[More detail about this title is available]

 

Electronic Copies: (10)

Cover image for An Anonymous Girl[More detail about this title is available]Cover image for Bring Me BackCover image for Lisey's StoryCover image for Where the Crawdads SingCover image for Dark of the MoonCover image for The Book of Lost ThingsCover image for The Lost ManCover image for The BreakdownMaid - ebook

 

Super Hold (3):

 

Cover image for The Waste LandsCover image for CIRCECover image for I'm Thinking of Ending Things

 

Read (2):

 

Cover image for The Time Traveler's Wife[More detail about this title is available]

Ehhh..

The One Who's Not the One - Keris Stainton

I honestly don't know what to say. I liked the character Cat and her friendship with Kelly and how much she loved her, Kelly's son, and Kelly's husband. That said, the whole book revolves about her getting feelings for her ex's brother. If that part had been cut out I would have loved it.

 

Cat is a former stand up comic who quit after her ex-boyfriend Sam (also a comic) moved to Australia 5 years ago and never came back. Cat we find out has some abandonment issues. What I think is funny about it is that Cat tries to deny it, but then Kelly keeps pushing her to realize that she has abandonment issues. Seriously that is most of this book. Kelly sounds like the best friend ever. I would have strangled Cat after a while if she was a real life friend. She's a mess job-wise and socially too. She falls for every guy who is near her and when she realizes Sam is back, she ends up meeting Harvey (Sam's brother) all over again and feels twinges.

 

I think the biggest thing for me in the end is that I can't think of anyone being okay with the situation. It would have been more realistic to me if everyone said what the hell are you thinking. Also I think Harvey is at least 10 years younger than Sam? I can't recall right now, but I do know he's younger and I wondered at her being ready for a long term relationship and would someone at his age be ready for one too.


That said, the best parts of this book were when Cat was interacting with Kelly and her whole family. I loved that we got to see a bit of Cat's stand up in the end, but think that we should have gotten that in the prologue somewhere. We just get a brief set up of Cat and her being in love with Sam and then she is downstairs in the family home and being lustful towards Harvey. It was so weird.

 

This book was fairly short (only over 200 pages) so there's not a lot of development of secondary characters outside of Kelly and her family. Harvey felt blank to me and so did Sam. We kept hearing how much Cat loved Sam's family, but we should have gotten a sense of that in the prologue or somewhere with actual scenes showing them interacting. 

 

In the end I can't complain too much, this was only $2.99 and it distracted me while flying all over the place the past couple of weeks. 

 

Come Along and Walk With Me

Mystery Walk - Robert R. McCammon

Well this was really good! I was pleasantly surprised since I have only really loved one of McCammon's books, "Boy's LIfe." "Mystery Walk" brought back some of that feeling of magical realism along with horror that I liked in the previous book. We also get introduced to some pretty epic characters (Billy Creekmore and his mother) and I ended up wanting to read more about Billy after the conclusion of the book. 

 

"Mystery Walk" begins with a pregnant Ramona Creekmore who has a gift. She can see the dead that have not peacefully passed on and she can set them free. Her husband John is a God fearing man (more on that later) who hates that Ramona is different. He believes her gift is a sin. When the book follows them years later after Ramona has given birth, they have their son Billy who they both love. Billy though appears to have taken on his mother and grandmother's gift and John is even more upset that his family appears to be "walking" with the devil. The book also follows Wayne Falconer and his father. Wayne's father is a tent revivalist and he claims his son can heal people. Something in Wayne allows him to feel things in certain people, but he really wants to do good and heal. However, something darker seems to have gotten a hold of him.

 

Billy and Ramona were the highlights of the book for me. I despised John Creekmore. A man using the Bible to incite terror in his son and wife and then also use the robes of the Klan to inspire fear in others was not someone that I sympathized with at all. I understood though why Billy and Ramona loved him though I puzzled at Ramona. Ramona is a Choctaw Indian and I don't get how her race wasn't seen as a deterrent to John though he had a lot of words to say about African Americans and how the world was going to end soon. 

 

Billy wants to be what his father wants him to be, but his mother's blood calls out for him to do what she does, to help those who have a hard time letting go of life pass on. The first time this happens to Billy gave me shades of "Boy's Life" and I shuddered a lot. I think at times though that Billy's character was quite naive. He wants to be like everyone else, but his mother and his own actions have made it hard for him to blend into the small town. When Billy realizes he has to move on (first to a carnival and then to an institute which can study him) he realizes he is going to get to see more than he could ever thought possible.


I felt sorry for Wayne and honestly disliked his sections. I went back and re-read though when we get a reveal I didn't see coming. Everything made sense at that point and I realized I hadn't picked up on anything. That said, I didn't feel sorry for Wayne. His whole character is just a hot mess and when we finally get to him and Billy meeting again I wondered at how it would go.

 

Most of the setting of the book takes place in a small town in Alabama. You get a sense of the town and the secrets it holds. Also for the ugliness at times when you get into how the Klu Klux Klan was running around and beating up and abusing anyone that didn't fit. The storyline following the preacher was horrific. I wish that McCammon had followed up on him. 


The book also shows Billy working at a carnival and I really enjoyed that whole setting. It was interesting and it reminded me a bit of Stephen King's "Joyland." When things moved to Billy at the institute I just found myself getting a bit bored. 

 

I will say the ending read as a bit off to me. I don't know. Maybe because I wanted some epic final battle or something that I felt a bit letdown by it. And though I was happy with how things are left with Billy, I did want to follow him a bit father along his mystery walk. 

Said the Spider to the Fly...

By a Spider's Thread - Laura Lippman

 

I honestly don't have much to say here except that I really enjoyed this updated look at Tess's life. She is still suffering some aftershocks after the events in the last book. Having to kill someone or she would be killed left a hole in her. She and her boyfriend are living apart since she feels like he is trying to "fix" her and keep her safe. She is back to rowing and doing investigations again. Her uncle brings her a new client who is trying to track down his wife and three children. He doesn't understand why she left and the police won't help him. When Tess starts digging deeper she figures out there are half-truths going on and a whole lot of lying. When she finally starts pulling things apart she figures out a long-standing conspiracy.


Tess was great to me in this one. She still has her two dogs and her family and her favorite aunt. Though she is a bit lonely without Crow around, she's making due. Lippman references a few times how the last case shook Tess's confidence. She doesn't know if she can be strong again, but we get to see her do just that a bunch of times throughout the story. I also think that Tess's cynicism was softened a bit in this one, but she's still no one's fool. Via Tess, Lippman always does a great job breaking down the history of the places that Tess is traveling to. 

 

We get introduced to a couple of new secondary characters in this one. We have Mark Rubin that has hired Tess to find his wife and children. I honestly didn't know what to make of him earlier on, but really liked that Lippman had things leaning one way until we get some shocking reveals here and there. Lippman also switches the POV's to Mark Rubin's wife Natalie, Rubin's son, and a mysterious man that has an unending hatred for Mark for some reason. 

 

We also get some familiar characters in this one, Tess's best friend Whitney, her aunt, and her aunt's long-time boyfriend too. 

 

I thought the writing was very good and that Lippman incorporated some more background on Orthodox Judaism which gave the book a different feel than prior ones. Rubin's religion definitely plays into what is going on or what he chose to not see. 

 

The flow was a bit off after a while though. I think once we realize as readers what is going on you may start to feel a bit impatient for things to get moving. 


The setting of Baltimore per usual seems to always have a presence in these books. We do have Tess traveling back and forth in this one, but for once the book stays centered in Maryland though Rubin's wife travels back and forth across multiple states.

 

The ending was really good and I didn't see the twist coming. I loved the epilogue and that we do see a hint of Tess's older cynicism rearing it's head. 

Reading progress update: I've read 55%.

Mystery Walk - Robert R. McCammon

Sorry all. Drowning in work so I have barely been anywhere lately.

Still loving this book! I didn't really enjoy Swan Song or Stinger, but loving this one and of course Boy's Life will be a favorite until I close up my eyes and curl up my toes for the last time. 

 

Seriously though John sucks and am shocked at Ramona and Billy putting up with him. Though I do feel bad that he got hurt protecting them from the klansmen who came to hurt them. Now we have Billy and Wayne as young adults which seem to be heading towards some sort of showdown. Can I say that I love Billy's sections the best and feel mostly impatient when reading Wayne's sections to get back to Billy? Billy Creekmore, his mother, and grandmother are so interesting to me. It reminds me a bit of King's "The Stand" though unlike with that book, there doesn't seem to be a family history of fighting with an eternal enemy. 

Reading progress update: I've read 100%.

By a Spider's Thread - Laura Lippman

Bangs head about cover. Sorry, tried to fix, but oh well. It's still the right book :-)

Great installation in the Tess Monaghan series!

Reading progress update: I've read 17%.

Mystery Walk - Robert R. McCammon

Am I supposed to hate John? Cause I do. What a loathsome character.

What is Love?

The Time Traveler's Wife - Audrey Niffenegger

So though I thought the ending was quite good, I had some issues with certain aspects of this book. All in all I saw love as a dangerous thing to be in since it seems to not work out for anyone that is in "love" in this one. And the first part of the book takes a while to get going. It helps that Audrey Niffenegger takes the time to include headers that show the date and age of Henry and Clare so you can keep things straight. A very strong three stars. 

 

 

We have a young girl Clare who is 6 that meets a 40 year old man named Henry. Henry is naked and tells Clare that he is a time traveler. He will see her repeatedly while she is growing up and without Clare realizing it, she's met the man she will one day marry. The book then follows Clare and Henry through the years until they finally meet up in her present and then walks through their marriage and the difficulties with Henry time traveling. The book speaks of loneliness throughout and even when Clare is near Henry, she's constantly bracing herself for him to leave at any moment. 

 

Clare was a bit hard to take once some things are revealed. No spoilers, but she's a terrible friend. She loves Henry and that's all she cares about. She doesn't worry about the issues they will have with him time traveling. She loves him and is going to be with him no matter what. Though Clare's art is important to her, it often feels secondary to her love of Henry and her inability to say no to him. Why Clare tells certain people about Henry's time travel baffles me too. I would have thought she was a liar and stayed away from her. 


Henry is pretty much a jerk I thought. He is rude and sarcastic though he loves Clare. He ends up becoming enmeshed in her life and becomes friends with her friends though one wonders why when he realizes what is going on with the character of Gomez. We hear about Henry's love of books, but I was pretty shocked that he barely seems to read. I guess if one is time traveling, you are just focused on not being killed when you pop up naked with no money or clothing. He and his father don't have a relationship since his father is still mourning his dead mother and has no love left to give Henry. Henry seems obsessive about sex with Clare (and she does about him too) that one wonders if these two ever had conversations after they meet in the present day. 

 

The secondary characters have their own tales of love which doesn't speak too highly of it we have lost love (Henry's father and the character of Kimy), broken hearts (Clare's mother), obsessive love (Gomez) and unrequited love (Charisse and Ingrid). This whole book screams out that love that is not painful is not worth having. 

 

The writing at times is lovely and others just choppy. I think once we get past a certain time period (no spoilers) we are just waiting for the inevitable to happen. The flow isn't that great to start with either. I think some things could have been cut, but that's just me.


The setting of the book moves from the 1960s to the year 2050 something. I can't recall right now. We have Clare and Henry mostly in Illinois though she is born and raised in Michigan with Henry of course doing pop by's here and there. 

 

The ending though was sad, but it moved me. I don't know if I could wait, but we get to see a future Clare and wonder how her life unfolded. 

Flow was Up and Down and the Beginning Was Boring

Telling Tales - Ann Cleeves

Not too much to say about this one. It was fine. I was bored though for the first 1/3 until we get Vera interacting with characters. Any time Cleeves away from her I found myself bored. The ending was very good though and a surprise. I liked how it was wrapped up.

 

"Telling Tales" takes a very long time to get moving. We start off with a young housewife, Emma Bennett who sits around having fantasies about the local potter, Dan. Things change one day when her husband James comes home on the news that the woman (Jeanie Long) who went to jail for murdering her best friend (Abigail Mantel)10 years ago has committed suicide. And to make things even worse, it appears that Jeanie didn't do it. Enter Vera and Joe who have been asked to look into this case and figure out who the first investigation got things wrong. This leads to Vera turning over some rocks and bringing things that haven't been said or thought of in a very long time to light.

 

Emma is a drip. She lives in a fantasy world and has daydreams of having an affair, but stands by her husband even if she finds him less exciting. It seems at times that maybe Emma is suffering from post-partum. She also has a huge issue with her parents. We find out that Emma's father was a very successful architect, but one day suddenly quit his job, and moved his family to the village of Elvet where he focuses on being a probation officer as well as making religion more of a focus of their family life.

 

Emma's husband and brother are both harboring secrets, though Emma's brother Chris has an obsession with Abigail and can't seem to move on from her murder.


We also follow Jeanie's father who is a broken man after realizing that his daughter was innocent and he didn't see her or defend her. He and Vera end up making an unlikely friendship I thought with him doing what he could to help her out on the case, and Vera trying to not get too irritated with him.


We also follow up with the original investigator and another officer on the case and we find out how their lives changed too. 

 

I thought the writing and dialogue got much better when Vera was on the scene. We have people reacting to her and her questions. Cleeves also does a great job with Vera and how she systemically picks things apart. We get some reveals I wasn't expecting and thought they were greatly done.


The flow though was not good. The first part of the book drags beyond belief. It was hard to get into and then things picked up. I think jumping from person to person didn't help.

The setting of Elvet seems a lonely and desolate place. Emma's parent's home seems cold and empty which was a perfect metaphor for what was going on with a lot of people.

The ending was a surprise, and I did wonder about the fallout for certain characters. I wonder if Cleeves ever mentions characters again in future works. 

SPOILER ALERT!

Epic Rant--Spoilers

Buried Prey - John Sandford

So I can't talk about this book without spoilers. That's how freaking annoyed I am. I may just give up reading anymore books in this series or ensuring they are library borrows. Lucas is not the end all be all for women everywhere. The fact that Sandford cheapens Marcy's death by forgetting her backstory and having her thinking about Lucas in a someday romantic style made me heave. And then of course everyone is not focused on Marcy. Oh hell no, everyone must be focused on preventing Lucas from murdering the serial pedophile murderer since everyone knows that he loved Marcy and must get his revenge. His freaking teenage daughter even talks to him about making sure he gets revenge. This book was a hot mess after we leave the "before" timeline and go back to the "present" timeline. That book ends in a whimpering mess.

 

"Buried Prey" starts off strong. We have Lucas standing by when the bodies of two young missing girls are found. These girls were the first case of a serial killer (he doesn't know that yet) that Lucas worked on as a cop back in 1985. This case had initially haunted Lucas, but he put it away. Now though he hopes to find the man who killed these girls. 

 

Sandford takes a different approach here. We follow Lucas back in 1985 (he sucked) and how he met some people we know now. And then we go back to the present day with Lucas working the case. We also get third person POVs of the serial killer and with Marcy. We only get Marcy for a bit though and then it becomes apparent why. Sandford decides to follow the age old formula of fridging a woman for a male character's development. Yes I booed long and hard on it. Heck if Sandford wanted it to hurt readers, he should have killed off Weather or even Letty (I would have cheered).

 

I am annoyed about the fridging for a variety of reasons. First, it makes zero sense that Marcy would be traveling solo. Second, Sandford in the last book had shown us that Marcy was married and had a toddler named James. In this one, Marcy is still single, not finding the one, and still thinking about Lucas. She even muses about getting with him again if something should happen to Weather. Third, Marcy ceases to matter after being murdered. Her death is an inconvenience because with her dead, Lucas may do something really really bad and that's the last 1/3 of the freaking book. People talking about Lucas and trying to prevent him from killing a serial killer. Though Sandford throws in a scene there with Letty asking Lucas how is he going to get the guy and kill him. I 100 percent hate this character. 

 

In the end though things don't matter. Lucas decides he's going to try to choke a guy out who has a gun and it causes one of his friends to shoot the guy and then he's dead. I mean forget the fact that he murdered and raped little girls. the most important thing is that Lucas isn't going to go to jail for killing him.

 

Sandford could have done so much more with this book. We don't even have Lucas following up with the parents in the present day. That would have been nice to see how their marriage fell apart after losing their kids. Maybe they would have blamed Lucas or the police for what happened. We could have had more heart in this one. The girls and the other victims felt like after thoughts. 

Davenport's Family is in Danger Again

Storm Prey (Lucas Davenport, #20) - John Sandford

Honestly not too much to say about this. The POVs with the bad guys in this one don't work. It was good to get more of Weather's POV though and I realize it's been a while since Sandford had her actually part of the story besides going to work and getting Lucas out of his bad moods. Other than that though, this book really doesn't work. The bad guys are some of the stupidest people ever. The fixation on killing Weather makes zero sense. And then there's an update about a character in this one that Sandford totally forgets about in the next book.

 

"Storm Prey" has Weather preparing for a really big medical case. She and her colleagues will be operating on conjoined twins. While getting to the hospital she happens to spy some men in an van and without realizing it, has seen men who have just robbed and murdered someone at the hospital. Once Lucas and others figure out what has happened, Weather and her family are under instant protection. Things intensify when Weather is almost gunned down while driving. Lucas, Marcy, Del, and others work almost 24/7 to figure out who the men are before Weather can be hurt.

 

Lucas is Lucas in this one. There is no serial killer to chase, but he's hell-bent on keeping Weather safe after someone comes after her. There are some updates on Marcy (happily married with one child) and Del (who just had his child too) and others we have gotten to know. Virgil shows up in this one too. There is the usual lousy cop jokes, but with more seriousness in this one since no one is going to let Weather, Letty, or Sam get hurt. There is also a discussion among Lucas and Weather about having another child. You think after adopting Letty they be good, but they and everyone else seems to find her charming. She's still a hot mess to me dancing towards being a psychopath. 


The only good parts which is the main reason why I gave this 3 stars is that we get to get in Weather's head in this one. And that's been a long time since we have done that since she's been introduced to readers. She's focused on saving the twins and that Lucas and everyone else will keep her safe.

 

The writing was okay, but switching to the multiple POVs with the multiple bad guys did not work. I started getting sick of reading them after a while and skimmed and dismissed. The flow wasn't great either. The first part was fine, but after that the whole book drags until we get to the end.

 

The ending was a surprise though and I don't know what else to say about it. I felt pretty indifferent towards things as soon as we got to the end. 

Reading progress update: I've read 100%.

Telling Tales - Ann Cleeves

Honestly the Vera books drag a lot. She tends to come in on the second act.

 

The writing is very good, but the flow in these books is awful. I kept muttering hurry up after I got to the 50 percent point. I don't know if it just going from Vera and back to other people is the issue or what. Any scene she is in sparkles so i was happy to read those. Anytime she's not in a scene I just found myself not caring much. 

 

It was nice though that the tv series changed up things. So even if you watched the Vera series, enough is changed about the who and why that made this fun to read. 

 

I just don't know if I will continue with trying to finish these or not.

Reading progress update: I've read 100%.

Buried Prey - John Sandford

Letty is still a psychopath and there's a huge continuity error in this book. I also hated the fact that the only way a woman matters to Lucas is if he's slept with her. This whole book falls apart after the death of one character. Sandford should have just focused on Lucas solving a case he feels terrible about decades later and left it at that. 

 

I don't know if I am going to continue with this series. I hear it does get a bit worse.